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Sharing science to find answers

Find RECOVER Publications

Researchers within the RECOVER Initiative share their progress to understand, treat, and prevent Long COVID through research publications. Follow the latest science from RECOVER’s research studies below.

Visit the Research Summaries page to learn about RECOVER’s Long COVID research in a format that’s easy to understand.

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53 Results

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EHR Adult Pediatric
Zhang, Y; Romieu-Hernandez, A; Boehmer, TK; et. al., medRxiv
Information
Caution: Preprints are preliminary reports of work that have not been certified by peer review. They should not be relied on to guide clinical practice or health-related behavior and should not be reported in news media as established information.
Published:
Journal: medRxiv
Abstract: An increasing number of studies have described new and persistent symptoms and conditions as potential post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC). However, it remains unclear whether certain symptoms or conditions occur more frequently among persons with SARS-CoV-2 infection compared with those never infected with SARS-CoV-2. We compared the occurrence of specific COVID-associated symptoms and conditions as potential PASC 31 to 150 days following a SARS-CoV-2 test among adults (≥20… Continue reading
Authors: Yongkang Zhang, Alfonso Romieu-Hernandez, Tegan K Boehmer, Eduardo Azziz-Baumgartner, Thomas W Carton, Adi V Gundlapalli, Julia Fearrington, Kshema Nagavedu, Katherine Dea, Erick Moyneur, Lindsey G Cowell, Rainu Kaushal, Kenneth H Mayer, Jon Puro, Sonja A Rasmussen, Deepika Thacker, Mark G Weiner, Sharon Saydeh, Jason P Block, PCORnet Network Partners
Keywords: Not available
Pathobiology Review Adult
Monje, M; Iwasaki, A, Neuron
Information
Epub ahead of print indicates that the article has completed the peer review process and has been published online in advance of the actual print journal issue being released.
Published:
Journal: Neuron
Abstract: Persistent neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms affect a substantial fraction of people after COVID-19 and represent a major component of the post-acute COVID-19 syndrome, also known as long COVID. Here, we review what is understood about the pathobiology of post-acute COVID-19 impact on the CNS and discuss possible neurobiological underpinnings of the cognitive symptoms affecting COVID-19 survivors. We propose the chief mechanisms that may contribute to this emerging neurological health… Continue reading
Authors: Michelle Monje, Akiko Iwasaki
Keywords: COVID-19; EBV; HSV; PAISs; SARS-CoV-2; astrocytes; autoimmunity; blood-brain-barrier; cognitive impairment; hippocampal neurogenesis; long COVID; microglia; microvascular disease; myelin; post-acute infection syndromes
EHR Adult
Jiang, S; Loomba, J; Sharma, S; et. al., arXiv
Information
Caution: Preprints are preliminary reports of work that have not been certified by peer review. They should not be relied on to guide clinical practice or health-related behavior and should not be reported in news media as established information.
Published:
Journal: arXiv
Abstract: It is shown that various symptoms could remain in the stage of post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC), otherwise known as Long COVID. A number of COVID patients suffer from heterogeneous symptoms, which severely impact recovery from the pandemic. While scientists are trying to give an unambiguous definition of Long COVID, efforts in prediction of Long COVID could play an important role in understanding the characteristic of this new disease. Vital measurements (e.g. oxygen… Continue reading
Authors: Sihang Jiang, Johanna Loomba, Suchetha Sharma, Donald Brown
Keywords: Not available
EHR Pediatric
Summary
Rao, S; Lee, GM; Razzaghi, H; et. al., JAMA Pediatrics
Published:
Journal: JAMA Pediatrics
Abstract: The postacute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC) has emerged as a long-term complication in adults, but current understanding of the clinical presentation of PASC in children is limited. To identify diagnosed symptoms, diagnosed health conditions, and medications associated with PASC in children. This retrospective cohort study used electronic health records from 9 US children's hospitals for individuals younger than 21 years who underwent antigen or reverse transcriptase-polymerase… Continue reading
Authors: Suchitra Rao, Grace M Lee, Hanieh Razzaghi, Vitaly Lorman, Asuncion Mejias, Nathan M Pajor, Deepika Thacker, Ryan Webb, Kimberley Dickinson, L Charles Bailey, Ravi Jhaveri, Dimitri A Christakis, Tellen D Bennett, Yong Chen, Christopher B Forrest
Keywords: Adolescent; COVID-19/complications/diagnosis/epidemiology; Child; Female; Humans; Male; Myocarditis; Retrospective Studies; SARS-CoV-2; Young Adult
Short Summary

RECOVER researchers used data in electronic health records (EHRs) from children’s hospitals that were a part of the National Pediatric Learning Health System Network (PEDSnet). Researchers looked for symptoms, health conditions, and medicines children had about 1 to 6 months after a COVID test. They compared children who did and didn’t have COVID to learn how many children who had COVID got Long COVID, and symptoms and health problems Long COVID causes in children.

The researchers learned that Long COVID is uncommon in children and happens in about 4% of children with COVID compared to in about 5% - 21% of adults with COVID. They also learned the Long COVID symptoms and health conditions that happen most often in children include changes in smell or taste hair loss, trouble breathing, and inflammation (swelling) in the heart or muscles.

EHR Adult
Summary
Pfaff, ER; Girvin, AT; Bennett, TD; et. al., The Lancet Digital Health
Published:
Journal: The Lancet Digital Health
Abstract: Post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection, known as long COVID, have severely affected recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic for patients and society alike. Long COVID is characterised by evolving, heterogeneous symptoms, making it challenging to derive an unambiguous definition. Studies of electronic health records are a crucial element of the US National Institutes of Health's RECOVER Initiative, which is addressing the urgent need to understand long COVID, identify treatments, and… Continue reading
Authors: Emily R Pfaff, Andrew T Girvin, Tellen D Bennett, Abhishek Bhatia, Ian M Brooks, Rachel R Deer, Jonathan P Dekermanjian, Sarah Elizabeth Jolley, Michael G Kahn, Kristin Kostka, Julie A McMurry, Richard Moffitt, Anita Walden, Christopher G Chute, Melissa A Haendel, N3C Consortium
Keywords: Adolescent; Adult; COVID-19/complications/diagnosis/epidemiology; COVID-19 Testing; Humans; Machine Learning; Pandemics; SARS-CoV-2; United States/epidemiology; Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome
Short Summary

RECOVER researchers wanted to learn if a computer program could identify if people have Long COVID based on electronic health records (EHRs). They used EHRs from the National COVID Cohort Collaborative (N3C). Researchers created and used a computer program to compare people with Long COVID to those who didn’t have Long COVID (based on whether or not people had a visit to a Long COVID clinic in their EHR). The computer program looked for patterns in people’s symptoms, health conditions, and other data.

The researchers concluded their computer program could be used to identify people with possible Long COVID. The computer program found that people with Long COVID have patterns in their health care visits, age groups, symptoms and health conditions, and the medicines they take. This could help connect people with Long COVID to health care or invite them to join research studies.

EHR Adult
Summary
Coleman, B; Casiraghi, E; Blau, H; et. al., World Psychiatry
Published:
Journal: World Psychiatry
Abstract: Not available
Authors: Ben Coleman, Elena Casiraghi, Hannah Blau, Lauren Chan, Melissa A Haendel, Bryan Laraway, Tiffany J Callahan, Rachel R Deer, Kenneth J Wilkins, Justin Reese, Peter N Robinson
Keywords: Not available
Short Summary

RECOVER researchers wanted to learn more about the chance of getting a mental health condition after having COVID. Researchers reviewed electronic health records (EHRs) of people who had COVID and people who had other types of respiratory tract infections (RTIs). They looked at how many people were diagnosed with a mental health condition shortly (21 days to 4 months) after having COVID compared to other RTIs. They also looked at how many people were diagnosed later (more than 4 months to 1 year) after having COVID compared to other RTIs.

The researchers found that people who had COVID were about a quarter (25%) more likely to be diagnosed with a mental health condition shortly after having COVID (21 days to 4 months afterwards) compared to people who had other RTIs. The researchers concluded that health care systems should do mental health screenings shortly after a person has COVID to better diagnose and treat mental health conditions.

EHR Adult Pediatric
Summary
Block, JP; Boehmer, TK; Forrest, CB; et. al., Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR)
Published:
Journal: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR)
Abstract: Cardiac complications, particularly myocarditis and pericarditis, have been associated with SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) infection (1-3) and mRNA COVID-19 vaccination (2-5). Multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS) is a rare but serious complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection with frequent cardiac involvement (6). Using electronic health record (EHR) data from 40 U.S. health care systems during January 1, 2021-January 31, 2022, investigators calculated incidences of cardiac outcomes… Continue reading
Authors: Jason P Block, Tegan K Boehmer, Christopher B Forrest, Thomas W Carton, Grace M Lee, Umed A Ajani, Dimitri A Christakis, Lindsay G Cowell, Christine Draper, Nidhi Ghildayal, Aaron M Harris, Michael D Kappelman, Jean Y Ko, Kenneth H Mayer, Kshema Nagavedu, Matthew E Oster, Anuradha Paranjape, Jon Puro, Matthew D Ritchey, David K Shay, Deepika Thacker, Adi V Gundlapalli
Keywords: BNT162 Vaccine; COVID-19/epidemiology/prevention & control; COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects; Female; Humans; Male; Myocarditis/epidemiology; Pericarditis/epidemiology/etiology; RNA, Messenger; SARS-CoV-2; United States/epidemiology; Vaccination/adverse effects
Short Summary

RECOVER researchers used data from over 15 million people’s electronic health records (EHR) to compare how many people have heart problems after having COVID or getting an mRNA COVID vaccine. They used EHR data from 40 healthcare systems in PCORnet, the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network.

Researchers found that the chance of having heart problems is higher after having COVID than after getting an mRNA COVID vaccine for men and women in all age groups. The overall chance of having heart problems after having COVID or getting an mRNA COVID vaccine was very low across all ages and genders. These results support the continued use of mRNA COVID vaccines for all people who meet the vaccine criteria.

EHR Adult Pediatric
Summary
Hernandez-Romieu, AC; Carton, TW; Saydah, S; et. al., JAMA Network Open
Published:
Journal: JAMA Network Open
Abstract: New symptoms and conditions can develop following SARS-CoV-2 infection. Whether they occur more frequently among persons with SARS-CoV-2 infection compared with those without is unclear. To compare the prevalence of new diagnoses of select symptoms and conditions between 31 and 150 days after testing among persons who tested positive vs negative for SARS-CoV-2. This cohort study analyzed aggregated electronic health record data from 40 health care systems, including 338 024 persons younger than… Continue reading
Authors: Alfonso C Hernandez-Romieu, Thomas W Carton, Sharon Saydah, Eduardo Azziz-Baumgartner, Tegan K Boehmer, Nedra Y Garret, L Charles Bailey, Lindsay G Cowell, Christine Draper, Kenneth H Mayer, Kshema Nagavedu, Jon E Puro, Sonja A Rasmussen, William E Trick, Valentine Wanga, Jennifer R Chevinsky, Brendan R Jackson, Alyson B Goodman, Jennifer R Cope, Adi V Gundlapalli, Jason P Block
Keywords: Adolescent; Adult; Age Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; COVID-19/epidemiology/physiopathology; Child; Child, Preschool; Cohort Studies; Female; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Male; Middle Aged; Prevalence; SARS-CoV-2; Socioeconomic Factors; Symptom Assessment/statistics & numerical data; Time Factors; Young Adult
Short Summary

RECOVER researchers reviewed electronic health records (EHRs) of about 12 million adults and children who had a COVID test to look for new symptoms and health conditions that happened 1 to 5 months after the COVID test. They used EHR data from 40 healthcare systems in PCORnet, the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network. Researchers compared new symptoms and health conditions in adults and children who did and didn’t have COVID (tested positive or negative) and whether they were hospitalized with COVID.

Researchers found that having COVID raised the chance of adults and children getting new symptoms and health conditions, especially trouble breathing, unusual heart rates, and type 2 diabetes. The chance of getting some new symptoms and conditions went up if they were hospitalized with COVID.

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